Every year for Mother’s Day and my birthday in October, I get to pick what we are going to do as a family. For a few years, in both the spring and the fall, I took my kids biking in Lanesboro. We’ve gone to Duluth to visit my mom and grandma and, one year, stayed at The Edge waterpark. We’ve also gone to the Mall of America. Last year, I took my sons to a Twins game. Spending time in the car with my older son is rare since he got his driver’s license. At the baseball game, we had fun food for lunch, and both of my boys bought souvenirs. It was a fun way to spend the day together. 

This year for Mother’s Day, I’m going to take my boys on a date night and help them learn how to dance. My older son is graduating from high school this spring, and I think it’s my responsibility to help him learn how to lead a dance partner. I’ve arranged for Eric Hoyer, owner of Med City Dance Center, now located at 1115 7th Street NW, to teach a mother and son dance class for boys ages 10-18 on Friday, May 12 at 5:30 and 6:30 p.m. If you would like to join me, along with Emily Watkins, owner of Empowered Wellness, and her two sons for an hour of rumba, waltz and swing, please contact me via email or RSVP on Facebook. Its only $30 per mother and son pair, plus $10 for each additional son. Make it a night out, and take them out to eat afterwards or pick up a $5 Pizza.

 

May/Jun
2017

Health, Wealth and Happiness: What is Happiness?

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Written by Emily Watkins

I vividly remember a moment, driving home from a date with my high school boyfriend, when I felt a physical wave of happiness sweep over me. That's an elusive feeling, one that is reserved for only the really special moments in life: walking down the aisle toward my love and holding my newborn sons, ranking the highest of those moments.

WHAT MAKES YOU HAPPY?

Things that make me happy: naps, reading good books, red wine, fluffy TV shows, watching my kids play sports, dates with my husband. But not many things bring that visceral feeling of happiness. 

Friends say happiness is family, children, God, being a source of healing for others, being a mom and wife, being part of a church community. Others say that keeping their minds and bodies engaged in meaningful pursuits and being able to control their own activities and change their minds are what make them happy. 

 

May/Jun
2017

Did You Say Something? Dementia or Hearing Loss

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Written by Dr. Amy Swain, Audiologist

Summertime brings family members together for reunions, weddings and graduation parties. During these events, we might notice our parents aging and sense some changes in their cognition or memory. You may begin to wonder if they have a memory issue. Researchers are now saying we should not assume it is a memory issue because it is possible they just didn’t hear the whole conversation.

LINK BETWEEN ALZHEIMER’S AND HEARING LOSS

Many studies show a link between Alzheimer’s disease and hearing loss. The reality is that hearing loss has a bigger impact on our health than we realize.

Frank Lin, otolaryngologist and epidemiologist at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, has completed multiple studies that reveal the link between cognitive decline and hearing loss. In his 2011 study, results showed that seniors with hearing loss were significantly more likely to develop dementia than their counterparts who had normal hearing. The reason for the link is unknown, but researchers have suggested that dementia and hearing loss might have a common underlying pathology. Dementia may be exacerbated for seniors with hearing loss because it takes more effort for that individual to hear and understand conversations, putting more stress on the brain.  

 

Cassie Fohrman enjoys her role as mom to the fullest. She enjoys taking her two daughters out for coffee (or hot chocolate) at Cafe Steam regularly and has a fun Sunday night routine of popcorn and ice cream. Now, isn’t that the coolest mom you’ve ever heard of? 

BEGINNINGS AND CAREER

Cassie was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota. She graduated from Kasson-Mantorville High School and says she has a “big reunion this year!” After high school, she attended Rochester Community and Technical College. 

“I started out doing general classes to get my associate’s degree at RCTC. I was working at Hy-Vee as an assistant manager. I went to the Hy-Vee Career Day in Des Moines, Iowa and met a girl who worked in the pharmacy. When I went back to Rochester, I found out that RCTC had the pharmacy technician program, so I took that opportunity,” Cassie explains. She started working at Mayo Clinic pharmacy and obtained her associate’s degree. She has worked in a few areas of Mayo within the pharmacy and says, “I just love the people I work with.” 

 

May/Jun
2017

Zoey Jantsan: The Dreamer Who Got Her Tiara

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Written by Renee Berg Portrait by Erin Young Portrait Design

When Zoey Jantsan strolls into Dunn Brothers Coffee, she’s wearing a plaid shirt from South Korea, a black pencil skirt and boots. She wraps her hands around her cup of tea and says she’s nervous because she hasn’t done many press interviews yet.

It isn’t long before Jantsan is talking about her dogs, her boyfriend and her decision to act on some lifelong dreams during recent years. At age 25, Jantsan realizes she’s carried out some passions from childhood these last few years, including her goal to secure a crown.

GETTING HER CROWN

Yes, a crown. Jantsan officially became Miss Minnesota U.S. International in October in Big Lake, Minnesota. As a child, Jantsan would wrap her mother’s mint green blanket around her waist and add a belt to keep it in place as her “poofy dress,” and adorn her head with a plastic tiara to complete her pretend pageant winner look. This last fall, her childhood dream came true.

Good thing, too, as she only has two years left before reaching the age limit of 27 to compete in Miss Minnesota U.S. International. “So I had to do it now, or I wasn’t going to do it at all,” she says.

 

May/Jun
2017

Stages of Motherhood: Who Am I?

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Written by Cheri Deruiter

When you were born I asked myself—who am I? God has blessed me with your presence, and I promise I will care for you, keep you safe and cherish every moment I have with you. I am your mother, and I will love you with all of my heart.

TODDLER STAGE

You soon grew into a toddler, and I had a new role to learn. Again, I asked myself—who am I? I am your teacher of all things new. I am your doctor when you are ill. I am your guardian, always keeping you safe. I am your playmate, your first best friend. You can always count on me. I promise I will never give up on you. Together we can conquer any challenge. I am your momma who loves you with all of my heart.

SCHOOL YEARS

I had tears in my eyes as I sent you off to a place I would only know through the stories you would tell me at the end of the day. I had to ask myself—who am I? I am your fashion designer, your tutor for reading and math, your event coordinator, your lunch lady, your personal baker, your hair stylist, your dentist, the enforcer of rules. I am your protector when you are scared or insecure. I am trying to be a good role model. I am so proud of you. You are my life. I am your mommy who loves you with all of my heart.

 

May/Jun
2017

Child Care: A Challenging but Rewarding Career Path

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Written by Jorrie Johnson

Choosing someone who will not only watch, but teach my child when he's not in my care is one of the most important decisions, I feel as a parent, I am called to make,” explains Laura Smith. 

Ideally parents find a child care provider that matches their work hours, is located near or on the way to work and meets their quality standards. However, the leading factor for finding child care around Rochester lately has been availability.  

LACK OF AVAILABILITY

There is a shortage of child care providers in the Rochester area. Smith started looking for child care when she was just three months pregnant with her first child. She contacted more than 100 different providers (both in-home child care and child care centers). According to Smith, “All of them for the most part said the same thing: ‘I feel for you.’”  

 

The arrival of a new baby is a life-altering experience encompassing a range of emotions. While weeks of preparation go into planning for the birth experience, there is a considerable gap in resources to address the needs of mothers after birth. In a recent report by the International Labour Organization, the United States—one of the few countries in the world without a federally mandated parental leave policy—received a failing grade in prioritizing support for women entering motherhood. 

Allison Loftus, MA, LPC, and Brittany Baker have a vision to fill that gap by providing services to empower and support women through the transition—whether it is first-time motherhood, a repeat pregnancy or even an adoption. 

MEDCITY DOULAS 

“The postpartum experience I had in the hospital with my first baby was eye-opening,” says Baker. “There were many gaps in the kinds of care women are receiving.”

 

May/Jun
2017

Fare with Flair: Mother and Daughter Restaurant Owners Share Love of Fun Fare

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Written by Sarah Oslund Photography by Fagan Studios

At the tender age of 9, Lindsay Zubay got her first taste of the restaurant business. She worked alongside her mother, father and two brothers at Newt’s, a long-time Rochester burger staple. Lindsay delivered food to customers’ tables. 

“I hated it,” she says, laughing. “The tables were numbered and, as a kid, I couldn’t always figure out where the food was supposed to go.” 

Now, two decades later, Lindsay is co-owner with her brother, Jason, and chef Justin Schoville of Rochester’s trendy new eatery, Porch, where they serve “urban farm fare that feeds your soul, as well as fills your stomach.”

WORKING ALONGSIDE HER MOTHER

LeeAnn Zubay is a staple herself in the Rochester restaurant scene. She is the owner and creative mind behind the successful ZZest Cafe & Bar, located on 16th Street Southwest, as well as the ZZest Lunch Counter and Market, which operate in the First Avenue Food Court in the downtown skyway. 

 

May/Jun
2017

Food Trucks of Rochester: Fast, Fresh, Fun

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Written by Emily Watkins Photography by Dawn Sanborn Photography

Food trucks! Easy, quick and delicious food to eat while basking in the warm sun. Do they make you think of summer?

With a mobile food unit permit from the Rochester City Council, food trucks can set up in the designated zone downtown, on private or public property as approved. All licenses or permits required by the State Health Department or Olmsted County Public Health must be obtained as well. These permits help ensure food safety for consumers.

FOOD TRUCK PURPOSES

Bryan Bachman, owner of Catering For All It’s Worth, says, “There are three main purposes for a food truck. First is selling downtown to the lunch crowd. Second is catering for private parties like birthdays, graduations or weddings. Third is setting up shop at breweries on weekends to provide food for people who want food to go with their local brews.”

 

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